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Kestral
15-05-2005, 00:09
Has anyone else found that Guild Wars makes their PC run hot? No other game or application makes my machine more than warm, but after about ten minutes running GW the case is uncomfortably hot. I'm beginning to worry about my components being damaged from overheating during an extended playing session, but I have no idea how to correct this

Of things I can see affecting the heat, I'm running:

Athlon 64 FX-51
GeForce FX 5950 Ultra
2GB of Corsair RAM
450 Watt Enermax fan
CoolerMaster ATC-201 midtower

Any ideas?

MyNameIsCronoTrigger
15-05-2005, 04:56
I had the exact same problem with GW though i noticed it was because the fan on my graphics card was broken :D. The strange thing was though that it only were "overheated" in GW, HL2 for example ran smoothly. My comp even started freezing up while i played GW (had to make a restart). But as soon as i discovered the fan was broken i bought a new (according to the store better) fan and now i have no problems at all. :happy14:

My Comp:
AMD 2500+ Athlon XP
1gb ram
Radeon 9600Pro
350W fan
Aopen Miditower

I dunno if this helps anything but you could maybe check if all the fans are running (you had a pretty High-End computer there) so check all fans and possibly if you havenīt already consider buying some more fans to the chassi. I assume that such a high-end computer as yours needs quite alot of cooling.

Dis
15-05-2005, 17:28
Yes many other ppl have this issue, I posted in here previously and was directed to this thread.

http://www.guildwarsguru.com/forum/showthread.php?t=10039

calderstrake
16-05-2005, 01:57
I find it so intersting that today's generation insists on placing blame on anyone but temselves. I read th posted link and all it seems to say is that no one wants to accept blame and wants the "game makers" to fix the problem with the game.

The specs on the GW site is there to tell you what you need in terms of hardware. Now, if you don't have that hardware properly installed or cooled, it will not help you one bit to have the correct hardware. Here are some general tips to follow:

1) You need at least two fans in your system, an intake and an exhaust. This keeps constant air moving through the case and can prevent most lock-ups due to no circulation.

2) You need to have a good fan on your CPU and GPU. In most cases, I would recommend a 3rd party CPU fan. Most video cards come with good fans unless you have an SE, LE, or otherwise 'lite' edition.

3) Put heatsinks on your chipset and memory. This includes the memory on your video card. Not only will this prevent lock-ups, but it will prolong the life of your components.

4) Use a 400W+ power supply. Some of you already do this, others do not. If you don't have one, I recommend putting it on your list of 'next to buy'.

5) Blow the dust out of your case at least once a month. Do you (or someone else) dust your house once a month? Then your PC should be no exception.

This should help in most cases.

hotdogtesting
16-05-2005, 02:23
I can tell you your reason without even blinking. You are running AMD.

Biases aside, AMD's are known to run at higher temperatures than Intels. It is mainly to do with their dynamic overclocking abilities (or in order models build-in overclocking... AKA turbo...).

I have found that a fan right by the CPU blowing air OUT of the case will solve the problem. The reason why you want to make sure it is blowing OUT is so that the system has a negative air pressure inside of it. This speeds up air flow and pulls hot air away from the CPU.

Nothing special is needed for such a fan. My current setup (also on an AMD system that used to overheat) uses a $5 fan from the local computer store. This fan won't help reduce the temperature during regular operation, because it only really starts spinning when temperatures are high...


As a side story and annecdote, the highest temperature I have ever had on my current setup was around 96 Degrees Celcius. In case, you are wondering 98 Degrees Celcius is the maximum temperature allowed. 102 Degrees Celcius is the meltdown temperature of most AMDs.

Corrodias
16-05-2005, 04:38
dude, i can't imagine how you can be even remotely stable at 96 C. going over 65 C is usually a sign you should be taking action. are you magical?

though i see you said that's the max temp ever recorded, so maybe it wasn't stable.

but still, i thought they stopped functioning somewhere in the 80's.

calderstrake
16-05-2005, 05:01
dude, i can't imagine how you can be even remotely stable at 96 C. going over 65 C is usually a sign you should be taking action. are you magical?

though i see you said that's the max temp ever recorded, so maybe it wasn't stable.

but still, i thought they stopped functioning somewhere in the 80's.
I concurr. I think your temperature readings must have been off. Did you use the BIOS? It is a known fact that almost all vendors use a different location to measure the temperatures. Also, they are not very accurate.

Naylia
17-05-2005, 14:36
I can tell you your reason without even blinking. You are running AMD.

Biases aside, AMD's are known to run at higher temperatures than Intels. It is mainly to do with their dynamic overclocking abilities (or in order models build-in overclocking... AKA turbo...).

I have found that a fan right by the CPU blowing air OUT of the case will solve the problem. The reason why you want to make sure it is blowing OUT is so that the system has a negative air pressure inside of it. This speeds up air flow and pulls hot air away from the CPU.

Nothing special is needed for such a fan. My current setup (also on an AMD system that used to overheat) uses a $5 fan from the local computer store. This fan won't help reduce the temperature during regular operation, because it only really starts spinning when temperatures are high...


As a side story and annecdote, the highest temperature I have ever had on my current setup was around 96 Degrees Celcius. In case, you are wondering 98 Degrees Celcius is the maximum temperature allowed. 102 Degrees Celcius is the meltdown temperature of most AMDs.

AMD's run flat out cooler than Intels, they use less power and generate less heat across the board. They generate extra heat when overclocked, but many times an OC'd AMD processor will still generate less heat than an intel. There's a reason Prescott's are often referred to as Preshotts. For a detailed guide to thermal characteristics of cpu's check out SilentPCReview.com, they rank processors by thermal characteristics there, the reason being that if it's cooler, than you can run your fans slower.

Rant aside, GW is not why your computers are overheating. The game can only make your CPU and GPU run at 100%. Now your case temps increase because there are a number of factors that contribute to temperature, first is the temperature of the room, second temperature inside the case. As the CPU and GPU heat up from heavy use they will increase the temperature inside the case. This feeds back into heating up the cpu. You have two(or more if you count northbridges and drives and other cards) that generate heat in a small confined area, if you don't have quality fans and heatsinks to dissapate heat then when your cpu is pushed to it's limits you will see and increasing temperature. Give it about half and hour and you'll find that temps stabilize at the maximum, but until then you can count on them climbing. A good way to check on stability at full throttle is by using a program like Prime95 or folding@home. These programs stress test your computers cpu and memory and will peg them at 100% for as long as you like. Most experienced home pc builders recommend stresstesting your pc with one of these programs for at least 8 hours, if not 24 when first assemblinig a pc. Prime95 will not only peg your cpu to the max but will also compare the calculations it performs to a list of known answers to make sure that the heat is not causing the cpu to miscalculate. It's possible to have inadequate cooling and your pc will still boot, but just because windows opens doeesn't mean it's stable at full throttle. If GW issues any kind of patch for this issue it will be that they tell the game not to use 100% of your resources, they'll limit it to 75% cpu usage or something like that i suspect. The game is not independantly capable of generating heat.

SilentPCReview has some fabulous recommended lists for fans and heatsinks for those of you looking to take care of your cpu, and if you spend a little bit of money on cooling you can make your pc not only run cooler but also run quieter with some big heatsinks and quality fans.