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XPtolemyX
16-10-2006, 23:55
I would like someone to please help me with a translation i want it to be in ether egyptian or persian please pm me for the name and also if this si the wrong forum i am truely sorry

Ps: im not lazy tried to find translation on my own

Goldfish God
17-10-2006, 01:46
yea, this forum is specifically for dervish. u might want community or offtopic forums for this sorta thing (or maybe nightfall pve).

Also I think a translation might end up in an entirely different alphabet :grin:

katya
17-10-2006, 01:55
Is this for a Dervish name? If so, you kinda have the right forum anyway. While I can't help with the translation, there are people who frequent here who might know people that do (Check Dervish names thread)

What are you looking to have translated?

meatloafman
17-10-2006, 03:42
google translator maybe?

ziba (farsi aka(persian/iranian)) = beautiful
uhh, beyond that i cant think of anything ud rly want... cuz i know mostly food lol...
kuchulu = something thats cute... if u ever saw a chinchilla then u'd call that kuchulu (thats as close as i can get to phoenetically spelling it)
khaeli (thats a throat scratch kinda typical arabic thing.. "kh" is like....uhh...saying hat cept with that throat kinda thing to it)... khaeli means very..

yea.... basic farsi pronunciation lesson for you right there... plz dont ask me for more though lol... unless you like to call your characters "beautiful rice" or "very cute pear".

ClarianAeneas
21-10-2006, 06:42
Egyptian = Arabic, which I happen to speak. What do you want translated, maybe I can help.


p.s. if you want ancient egyptian you can forget it :)

rodinia
22-10-2006, 13:34
I hope someone here can help me. Do these names below have some weired meaning I should know about before using either of them?

Kharaib, Shu’aiba, Huqf, Qishn, Hawar, Dhahaban, Natih, Khuff, Mishrif, Magwa, Ahmadi, Wara, Mauddud, Nahr Umr, Tuwaiq, Dhruma

I know Shu'aiba is a port in Kuwait and Dhahaban is in Yemen, and the other names are probably also linked to some localities. If you wonder: they are all names of oil-bearing rocks on the Arabian peninsular and all my characters have names related to geology in some way, but I usually know the meaning of the words I use :rolleyes: .

Rodinia

jhffmn
22-10-2006, 15:39
Egyptian = Arabic, which I happen to speak. What do you want translated, maybe I can help.


p.s. if you want ancient egyptian you can forget it :)


Is Arabic really the main language of Egypt. I always thought of arabic as more like hebrew, a language widely known but not neccessarily widely used.

Lais Irideika
22-10-2006, 16:24
To the OP, what is it that you want translated? If you don't tell us what you want translated, we can't possibly help you. Unless of course you want it to be kept secret, if it's for a character name you want and don't want it to be stolen (which I totally understand, cuz I would never post a future, yet uncreated character name of mine anywhere on a GW fan-based forum).

I XM
22-10-2006, 17:09
Is Arabic really the main language of Egypt. I always thought of arabic as more like hebrew, a language widely known but not neccessarily widely used.
Off-Topic:
Well here in the UK children are now officially starting to be advised to not take the usual languages like French and German but to learn: Mandarin, Arabic and to a lesser extent, Spanish. The three languages of the future.

China has overtaken the UK as the 4th economic power this year. In 10-15 years it will have overtaken the US as number 1. And in 20-25 years India will have caught up and will be the long term number 1, with China close behind. Those two countries already have 20% of the world population each and Muslims many (not all: urdu, farsi and other regional languages are often more used) of whom speak arabic are also close to 20% of the world population. So knowing English (for India), Mandarin and Arabic means you'll be able to do business with the two big world super powers and talk to the three groups that will soon make up more than 60% of the world.

Spanish is less important especially since some main regional south american leading countries like Brazil speak forms of portuguese. But it will definitely become more and more useful to know it, as these countries free themselves from their shackles and become more powerful.

jhffmn
22-10-2006, 23:33
Off-Topic:
Well here in the UK children are now officially starting to be advised to not take the usual languages like French and German but to learn: Mandarin, Arabic and to a lesser extent, Spanish. The three languages of the future.

China has overtaken the UK as the 4th economic power this year. In 10-15 years it will have overtaken the US as number 1. And in 20-25 years India will have caught up and will be the long term number 1, with China close behind. Those two countries already have 20% of the world population each and Muslims many (not all: urdu, farsi and other regional languages are often more used) of whom speak arabic are also close to 20% of the world population. So knowing English (for India), Mandarin and Arabic means you'll be able to do business with the two big world super powers and talk to the three groups that will soon make up more than 60% of the world.

Spanish is less important especially since some main regional south american leading countries like Brazil speak forms of portuguese. But it will definitely become more and more useful to know it, as these countries free themselves from their shackles and become more powerful.

But since computer languages are all in english as far as I know, all other languages are more or less moot. :grin:

ClarianAeneas
23-10-2006, 01:10
Is Arabic really the main language of Egypt. I always thought of arabic as more like hebrew, a language widely known but not neccessarily widely used.


Actually arabic is very widely spoken by all Arabs. In addition to formal (written) Arabic, which most arabs(and many Muslims in general if they want to be able to read the Qur'an) learn at school, Arabs speak a different form of conversational arabic which varies slightly from place to place. For example I'm Palestinian, if I go to Egypt, or the U.A.E., I can speak with people there but there will be a few different words (unless we use formal arabic).

oh and as for the computer language comment: keeping track of all the semi-colons and brackets is annoying enough when typing, I can't imagine having to say them. :P


I hope someone here can help me. Do these names below have some weired meaning I should know about before using either of them?

Kharaib, Shu’aiba, Huqf, Qishn, Hawar, Dhahaban, Natih, Khuff, Mishrif, Magwa, Ahmadi, Wara, Mauddud, Nahr Umr, Tuwaiq, Dhruma

I know Shu'aiba is a port in Kuwait and Dhahaban is in Yemen, and the other names are probably also linked to some localities. If you wonder: they are all names of oil-bearing rocks on the Arabian peninsular and all my characters have names related to geology in some way, but I usually know the meaning of the words I use :rolleyes: .

Rodinia

Nope, nothing wrong in arabic as far as I can tell.

jhffmn
23-10-2006, 01:25
Actually arabic is very widely spoken by all Arabs. In addition to formal (written) Arabic, which most arabs(and many Muslims in general if they want to be able to read the Qur'an) learn at school, Arabs speak a different form of conversational arabic which varies slightly from place to place. For example I'm Palestinian, if I go to Egypt, or the U.A.E., I can speak with people there but there will be a few different words (unless we use formal arabic).

oh and as for the computer language comment: keeping track of all the semi-colons and brackets is annoying enough when typing, I can't imagine having to say them. :P



Nope, nothing wrong in arabic as far as I can tell.

Ahh ok, see I knew that muslims are required to learn arabic, but I was not aware that it was widely spoken. I was under the impresion that most people in muslim countries had native languages other than arabic, but that arabic was known by everyone, kind of like english in europe.

I am just glad I speak english, everyone else just learns our language so I don't have to worry about learning another language lol.

ClarianAeneas
23-10-2006, 23:35
Ahh ok, see I knew that muslims are required to learn arabic, but I was not aware that it was widely spoken. I was under the impresion that most people in muslim countries had native languages other than arabic, but that arabic was known by everyone, kind of like english in europe.

I am just glad I speak english, everyone else just learns our language so I don't have to worry about learning another language lol.

No, Muslims aren't required to learn arabic, it's just preferrable if you want to be able to read the Qur'an in it's true form. Alot of the meaning gets lost in translation. In Muslim countries like Pakistan or Indonesia people speak their own languages, but all ARABS (like Egyptians) speak Arabic (obviously). :)