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Thread: Book thread!

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Gaendaal
    Post a book, who it's by and why I should read it.

    EDIT: Sorry, this should be in Off Topic. Can it be moved, please?

    100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    amazing book... won the author a Nobel Prize in the '70s... 'nuff said

    takes place in South America, is twisted, somewhat historical, messed up is a good word to describe it... amazing style of writing! WHOOP

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceragnathus
    100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    amazing book... won the author a Nobel Prize in the '70s... 'nuff said

    takes place in South America, is twisted, somewhat historical, messed up is a good word to describe it... amazing style of writing! WHOOP
    Blech....I graduated from SWT. I am sick of Marquez. I find him a touch overrated, myself, but I have a friend who absolutely swears by that book. Of course, there is one caveat--you need to speak Spanish, which is, of course, the original language.

    You might expect I'd recommend The Fountainhead or Atlas Shrugged, given my recent discursive adventures. But I won't, not in the least because both of them are entirely too long.

    However, I do have one surprising recommendation--Desperation, by Stephen King. It's actually a pretty good examination of the problem of Job in the modern context.

    Donaldson is also great if you're not the suicidal type (his books tend to be a touch depressing, and his leads have a strange habit of starting off all his series by becoming rapists of greater or lesser extent). I'd recommend The Gap Cycle from him. And The Real Story is the single greatest academic example of a three part drama I have ever seen in my life, so that's extra dressing.

    And, of course, Hamlet, which is still, at the very least, among the greatest works of prose ever perpetrated on the universe.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by themagicmoedee
    Blech....I graduated from SWT. I am sick of Marquez. I find him a touch overrated, myself, but I have a friend who absolutely swears by that book. Of course, there is one caveat--you need to speak Spanish, which is, of course, the original language.
    Well I did mean the translated version...

  4. #24
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    The Lord Valentine/Majipoor series by Robert Silverberg. Or anything else by him, basically. He writes a lot of sci-fantasy and his words paint pictures in your mind. Not many authors have been able to do that for me and I've read tens of thousands of books, so he's a real rarity.

    The Gormenghast Trilogy, by Mervyn Peake. An incredible story about the lives of people in a castle literally the size of a city. Another mind-painter, though in a more ponderous and dusty manner.

    The Song of Ice and Fire, naturally, though I'm a bit peeved with GRRM after the way he left his latest installment hanging...

    Many, many other books far too numerous to mention (or remember, for that matter).
    mv

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    Quote Originally Posted by MixedVariety
    The Song of Ice and Fire, naturally, though I'm a bit peeved with GRRM after the way he left his latest installment hanging...
    Supposedly a great series, but one warning: let him finish it first. A lot of people bought into Robert Jordan back when Wheel of Time was good, and now, in addition to being pretty terrible writing, the man has become infected with a disease that gives him perhaps a fifty percent chance of survival, so we may end up with eleven books to no real end.

  6. #26
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    Dune or Crime and Punishment both fine choices

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by themagicmoedee
    Supposedly a great series, but one warning: let him finish it first. A lot of people bought into Robert Jordan back when Wheel of Time was good, and now, in addition to being pretty terrible writing, the man has become infected with a disease that gives him perhaps a fifty percent chance of survival, so we may end up with eleven books to no real end.
    I know what you mean, though I've never been enamored of the Wheel of Time series at all. I just don't think Robert Jordan has what it takes, period, illness or not. His writing skills dried up.

    GRRM, on the other hand, always excels. I can see him not finishing the series, because he is indeed going about it slowly; but I don't see him going bad.

    I usually do not read any series that isn't finished first, but this time, with his first book, I made a mistake in thinking it was a standalone novel and became hooked.
    mv

  8. #28
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    The problem with the Wheel of Time series is that it has grown beyond its own capacity to be a good story. There are simply far too many characters and far too many sub-plots all running at the same time for it to remain a truly cohesive story. If you read some of the latest books, for example, there are perhaps only a chapter or two devoted to the 3 main characters, with the rest of the book covering the stories of several secondary characters.

    In my opinion, Jordan has superb writing skills. If you look at each of his chapters individually, they are very well written. But because the book lacks a central focus, it ends up giving off a very scatter-brained feeling and looks like its just meandering about the story world with no real focus.

    I place the blame mainly on the publishers. Jordan originally wanted the story to be just a trilogy, but after the first book sold so well, his publishers wanted to milk the series for all it was worth, and so Jordan continued to expand the story well beyond the point when it should have ended. (And personally, I think he should have known better.) If you ask me, he needs to refocus the story back on Rand, Mat and Perrin, and leave all of the extra sub-plots for future series that run concurrently with the main story's timeline.

    Now, back to the spirit of the OP, no book recommendation thread would be complete without a recommendation of 1984, by George Orwell. It's one heck of a depressing read, but damn it's good!

  9. #29
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    Arthur C. Clarke, his latest novels in cooperation with Stephen Baxter, Time's Eye and Sunstorm. (SF)

    Stephen Baxter's Evolution was a lot of fun to read. It's about the evolution of humankind. From the very first roots till the end when the sun dies.

    Robert J. Sawyer, the Neanderthal Paralax (Hominids, Humans and Hybrids). I really loved these books. It's a bit of a "what could have been".

    Stephen R. Lawhead, The Pendragon Cycle (Taliesin, Merlin, Arthur, Pendragon and Grail). A very nice tale about the origin of King Arthur (did you know that Merlin was a son of Atlantis by way of his mother?)

    And I love the wilderness stories of Jack London (White Fang, Call of the Wild). Classics, but they still grip me.
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  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Rhonwyn

    And I love the wilderness stories of Jack London (White Fang, Call of the Wild). Classics, but they still grip me.
    Goodness, yes! I can't forget the classics that actually got me interested in reading. Jack London, Mark Twain, L. Frank Baum--the author of The Wizard of Oz (he wrote something like 14 books in the Oz series, and some of them were incredible, amazing...), Herman Melville, Edgar Allan Poe, etc. etc.
    mv

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