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Poll: Do you believe it takes faith to believe there is no god?

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Thread: Faith

  1. #1

    Faith

    I have a question for you all. It could be a very interesting, debatable subject!

    Do you think it takes as much faith to believe in no God as it does to believe there is one?

    I personally think it does. Who is to say that there is nothing out there? Some diety that created anything? Life just seems too complicated for there not to be a god. Also, since there is no proof that there is or is not a god, then it takes just as much faith to believe there isn't one IMHO.

  2. #2
    Being picky, I think your wording is a bit bias.

    "faith" and "believe" pretty much imply a religious mentality.

    There is no proof of god, so you just don't have to believe in it, no faith or belief at all. Belief implies a form of effort, but none is required. Not believing in a god is not the opposite of believing in a god, it is the absence of that belief.

    It doesn't take any faith to believe you wont be a good brain surgeon if you want to be a painter. There is no faith involved since it's not even in your scope of thought.

  3. #3
    Been there, debated that. Bottom line: yes, I consider Atheism to be a religion, in that there's no more proof that there isn't a God than that there is. By its very definition, the idea of "God" puts it so far into the metaphysical realm that you will never be able to prove/disprove the existence, which is what makes accepting a divine power a matter of faith. You can choose to believe that there isn't one, but in the end the position isn't any more tenable than choosing to believe that there is one.




    obligatory disclaimer: I'm a Buddhist

  4. #4
    Gaendaal's Obligatory answer to the God Question...

    Atheists believe that there isn't a God. Agnostics believe that there *might* be a God.

    I don't care if there's a God.

    Faith? Meh... It's a nice name. Nothing more.

  5. #5
    What? Does it take faith to not believe in something?

    Do you need faith to not believe in the Gods Jupiter, Neptune, Hades, and Zeus, or in the Flying Spaghetti Monster? Do you need faith to not believe that the world was created by my cat last tuesday as it is including memories and such? Do you need faith to believe that I can't fly unaided? Do you need faith to not believe in the boogie man, big foot, area 51, and the loch ness monster?

    No, all these can be laughed away as superstition and myth based on simple logic and Occam's razor.

    Life wasn't created randomly as it is: evolution, contrary to uninformed belief, isn't random. Complexity is in fact proof of evolution more then proof against it.

    When you understand why you dismiss all other possible gods you'll understand why I dismiss all possible gods.
    (and for those who don't believe in a specific god)And when you dismiss all gods humans have come up with you'll realize that lacking direct intervention in human lives the only reason you believe in a god at all is that you've reverted to the "god of the gaps" who originally explained things like the sun rising and the seasons, but today explains complexity and the big bang. Perhaps tomorrow, when the general public understands those things, he'll explain quantum mechanics or the separation of normal and dark matter.

    Or perhaps you're saying I need faith to believe in evolution. If you think that you don't understand evolution or the scientific method in general.
    Last edited by Drec Sutal; 06-04-2007 at 01:14.

  6. #6
    No, I definitely don't think it takes as much "faith" (or I think the word should be "conviction") to believe there is no such thing as a God, than it does to believe that there is.

    It's much easier to just throw your hands up in the air and say "well, there is no proof that there is such a thing is a God, so I choose to believe there isn't one". Believe me: I know.

    I consider myself an atheist, but there are times where I think there might be some higher power that we do not know. I almost admire those who have a strong faith and conviction that there is such a higher power, even though they have no tangible proof of it. They have much stronger faith than someone who is an atheist.

    Edit: thank you Gaendaal! Now I can call myself an agnostic... I was not aware of this... Ya learn something new every day (even about yourself it seems! )

  7. #7
    Yes, but some of you haven't answered the posited question. You've only answered whether you believe in God or Flying Spaghetti Monsters, and Dude, you've got one helluva cat, Drec! Can I borrow him?

    The question is "Does it take as much faith to not believe?" And I would say possibly. It would depend solely on how many discussions you enter into of a religious nature where you have to defend your "non-belief". When people push at you, is it tougher to maintain the non-belief or to believe in Drec's omnipotent Cat jut to shut people up?

  8. #8
    Secretly I didn't make that up.

  9. #9
    Of course it does.

    Much how it takes faith to believe that when you let go of a hammer, it will fall.

    And much how it takes faith to believe that the world does not dissapear when you close your eyes.

    And how it takes faith to believe that the people around you are actual people, and not just figments of your imagination.

    And how it takes faith to believe that you really aren't a disembodied brain in a tank.

    Hell, it takes faith to believe that you will be severely hurt, should you choose to try to cross a busy street on foot.

    Without faith, you would not be able to commit yourself to any action, or any inaction. It takes faith to do anything.

    The difference is, you can justify some of those leaps of faith, but not others.

    Been there, debated that. Bottom line: yes, I consider Atheism to be a religion, in that there's no more proof that there isn't a God than that there is. By its very definition, the idea of "God" puts it so far into the metaphysical realm that you will never be able to prove/disprove the existence, which is what makes accepting a divine power a matter of faith. You can choose to believe that there isn't one, but in the end the position isn't any more tenable than choosing to believe that there is one.
    Actually, believing that there isn't an invisible, omnipotent puppetmaster pulling all the strings, is superior to the alternative position, for the sheer reason of simplicity.

    If I hit one pool ball with another, you can provide me with a very lengthy explanation of how the Karmic Energy of the balls interacts to make the second ball move, and how it's made possible by the Flying Invisible Unicorn, while I can explain it with a citation of a basic law of physics.

    The latter is simpler, easier to understand, respectful of Occam's razor, and more plausible.

    Yes. It's more plausible, considering that if you don't consider simpler, more straightforward explanations, which can accurately predict the future more plausible, then I don't see why you aren't equally sceptical of the consequences of getting hit by a fast-moving automobile.
    Last edited by MasterNightfall; 06-04-2007 at 02:56.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by MasterNightfall View Post
    ...Flying Invisible Unicorn...
    You mean the Invisible Pink Unicorn, May Her Hooves Never Be Shod. A flying invisible unicorn would be silly and clearly false. Other then that decent argument.

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