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  1. #51
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    Right right. Trademarks.

    The central issue though remains that if you have a good idea (whatever category that falls into) then you need to protect yourself when sharing it, or someone else than you might end up profiting from it.
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  2. #52
    GWOnline.Net Member Kael Valeran's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaris View Post
    That is a scary though, Kael, as in my position for example... I have a few good ideas, but someone else with more experience could easily scoop those ideas and make them their own. Then my hard work into making those ideas (and testing them and refining them) would be lost to someone else's profit.

    I don't want my ideas to necessarily remain my own, I would in the best of cases be able to share them and not worry at all about copyrights and all that... but the fact is that if I want to make a decent living, I have to be careful. Until we as a society start rewarding those who provide solutions (and not just those who market them successfully) then copyright laws have their place.
    One idea is not skill or talent. It may be due to coincidence. What I meant by wisdom, intelligence and skill is constant self-improvement. It does not rely on a single idea because that talent is used to make loads of brilliant ideas, each idea being brighter than the previous and will consistently continue to make even better ideas that is uniquely different and creative from what the average joe not specialised in that particular field can produce. We need to reward people with such brilliant ideas and remove the obstacles from letting them consistently generate products of their talent.

    Also, no one should be a one-trick pony. One-trick mentality often leads to theft and goes against innovation.

  3. #53
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    Perhaps you're not understanding me clearly. Let me explain.

    My "idea" isn't a singular idea. It's a constellation of ideas. I have given it a lot of thought on how every aspect relates to the other aspects, and how it culminates into a whole that works together. It's not a one-trick pony idea, but it is a set of ideas that form a unit. It took me considerable work and time to form that idea. I have essentially done the work to make sure that the idea is well-rounded, feasible, and self-sustaining. And if I implement it and it starts selling, I'll have shown proof of concept and viability as well.

    Now a company could easily look at what I've done, and say "hey that's great let's steal it". Because I already have done all the work to figure out the details, they can easily catch up. My hard work thus amounts to nothing but a small head start, one mind you which is of little help because they too have a head start elsewhere, say in having more hired artists and programmers, whereas I am dependent on my idea to start myself. They can literally steal my idea, slap it into a sequel of a game they already have, and start making profits. I however need to prove myself to the market and gain a following before I can even start making money off of my idea.

    I can keep making new ideas, but perhaps not fast enough to compete with those who steal them from me. Maybe I will actually succeed and then I can, as you say, live off my new ideas. Or maybe I will fail, fail to gain the momentum that would let me be viable against already-established companies that have made their place by stealing other's ideas.
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  4. #54
    GWOnline.Net Member Kael Valeran's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaris View Post
    Perhaps you're not understanding me clearly. Let me explain.

    My "idea" isn't a singular idea. It's a constellation of ideas. I have given it a lot of thought on how every aspect relates to the other aspects, and how it culminates into a whole that works together. It's not a one-trick pony idea, but it is a set of ideas that form a unit. It took me considerable work and time to form that idea. I have essentially done the work to make sure that the idea is well-rounded, feasible, and self-sustaining. And if I implement it and it starts selling, I'll have shown proof of concept and viability as well.

    Now a company could easily look at what I've done, and say "hey that's great let's steal it". Because I already have done all the work to figure out the details, they can easily catch up. My hard work thus amounts to nothing but a small head start, one mind you which is of little help because they too have a head start elsewhere, say in having more hired artists and programmers, whereas I am dependent on my idea to start myself. They can literally steal my idea, slap it into a sequel of a game they already have, and start making profits. I however need to prove myself to the market and gain a following before I can even start making money off of my idea.

    I can keep making new ideas, but perhaps not fast enough to compete with those who steal them from me. Maybe I will actually succeed and then I can, as you say, live off my new ideas. Or maybe I will fail, fail to gain the momentum that would let me be viable against already-established companies that have made their place by stealing other's ideas.
    You don't seem to get the point. Right now patent laws are working for established companies who can bully their way into anything.

    If you have a headstart, usually only after you have achieved some degree of success will other established companies try to leech from you. By then, it will be late.

    Lastly, think of it in both ways, you can steal their ideas too! No companies can claim dominance over any idea but rather the execution of the idea. However, but by the time you start stealing, the idea becomes rusty somewhat and you will need to improvise on it. Everyone improvises on the same idea differently and if the idea is truly your own and there are hidden aspects to its potential, it is likely the other companies will not tap that idea to its full potential. There is also the matter of execution. Sometimes you need to keep things to yourself and execute the art at the right time at the right moment. Most people will ignore what you say anyway until the idea actually sells.

    I would imagine this will discourage big corporates to form as they cannot use reserves to protect an idea and prevent it from being used/abuse their power, instead, a lot of smaller companies and proprietorships will emerge and constantly fight to produce new, modern, innovative and good ideas.

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Zalis View Post
    While "any press is good press" rule applies, I think app developers are a bit different. Their production costs & overhead costs don't compare to those of AAA multi-platform titles.
    Yeah I was going to say this.

    If you're retailing for $60 and a million people pirate it, you're missing out on MUCH more than if you're selling for $1 and it gets pirated ten million times.

    And the argument that more games are selling now than ever before sounds like a good one, but consider how many new, original IPs are coming out? Companies are just sinking money into the stuff they know will sell, not taking any risks. I mean I obviously can't say it's because of piracy, but the costs for making those big games is also way higher than it's ever been before, they need increased sales and market penetration.

    Also unrelated: Tim Schaefer has been pitched Psychonauts 2 to publishers and none have taken him up on the offer. But it looks like it might happen with the unpredictable support of Notch and Mojang?
    Last edited by Zayren; 07-02-2012 at 23:00.

  6. #56
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    They go with known IPs because it sells easier, not because they have to, but because they can squeeze more cash out of us. The fact that there are more movies and games with high costs being produced should be hint enough that the business is doing well.

    If they were really struggling, then we'd be going back to indie. Scratch that, the indie is booming too.
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  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zayren View Post
    If you're retailing for $60 and a million people pirate it, you're missing out on MUCH more than if you're selling for $1 and it gets pirated ten million times.
    Missing out, yes, but losing the same amount? Markup on games is ridiculous. LOL NITPICK

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Zayren View Post
    If you're retailing for $60 and a million people pirate it, you're missing out on MUCH more than if you're selling for $1 and it gets pirated ten million times.
    Any proof for this? Or are you using content mafia math? Because to me it seems far less likely that people who downloaded a $60 game would have bought that game if it hadn't been available as an illegal download. Pretty much everybody has a dollar, but 60 dollars is a totally different story especially when it is one of those 4-6 hours gameplay console titles.

    Reflexive Entertainment had a piracy problem, after eliminating illegal downloads this is what they found:
    [...] As we believe that we are decreasing the number of pirates downloading the game with our DRM fixes, combining the increased sales number together with the decreased downloads, we find 1 additional sale for every 1,000 less pirated downloads. Put another way, for every 1,000 pirated copies we eliminated, we created 1 additional sale.

    [...] The sales to download ratio found on Reflexive implies that a pirated copy is more similar to the loss of a download (a poorly converting one!) than the loss of a sale.

    Though that doesn’t make a 92% piracy rate of one of our banner products any less distressing, knowing that eliminating 50,000 pirated copies might only produce 50 additional legal copies does help put things in perspective.

  9. #59
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    Wow. 1:1000 ratio.
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  10. #60
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    Ho ho ho

    I wish more companies would do studies like this and release the info. Honestly, it makes sense: If someone is going to pirate stuff, they most likely aren't a consumer.

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